Sunday, January 20, 2008

Obesity Rate In United States - How It May Effect You During A Death Of A Loved One.


Being a Funeral director, I get many questions from time to time about the different aspects of funerals, cremation, etc. A question I was recently asked from a consumer was “With Regard To Caskets Are They One Size Fits All?

This is a great question and with the nations current laser focus being on the growing obesity rate in the United States this is one subject I thought I may address on this blog. West Virginia ranked #2 in the nation for the largest obesity rate of 29.7% so this is a concern for all West Virginians.

To answer the question, one casket does not fit all but the majority of the time the standard sized casket will be acceptable for most individuals.

The standard casket is sized for the average size and weight individual which is (typically 23”-24” interior width) and then there are caskets for what is called plus size which is when a little more space in needed (typically 26” – 29” interior width). Then there are true oversize caskets and they are available in a few escalated sizes (typically, 30”-32” interior width and can go higher) and depending on the size and weight of the deceased individual.

With the growing concern surrounding obesity in America some companies such as the one in which I am employed has established a complete line of plus-size and oversize caskets offering the same color schemes, features, advantage and benefits, material choices of standard caskets.

For many years when a family may need to employ the use of an oversize casket their choices in color and material type was very limited. Today there are many choices available.

West Virginia ranked #2 in the nation for the largest obesity rate of 29.7%

Take a moment and review the data below gathered from Calorieslab.com.

Good Reading,

Fred



For 2007 Mississippi has once again claimed the title of fattest state, while Colorado repeats as the leanest. Wisconsin rose the most places in the rankings over last year, while California dropped the most, according to a new analysis by CalorieLab, Inc.

Mississippi is the first state ever whose obese population exceeds 30% over a three-year average. And two-thirds of its citizens were either overweight or obese by CDC standards in 2006.

West Virginia replaced Alabama as the second fattest state, while Oklahoma entered the fattest ten for the first time, tying for ninth place. Also not faring well this year were Wisconsin, which rose seven places to 22, and South Carolina and Nevada, both of which rose four places, to 5 and 37 respectively.

“As an avid fisherman and bike rider, I know first-hand that Colorado provides a great environment for active, healthy lifestyles,” commented Governor Bill Ritter of Colorado, on hearing that his state ranks leanest in the CalorieLab rankings. “However, we’re not spared from the national obesity epidemic, and we must remain vigilant in order to guard against it. We’re doing all we can to encourage Coloradans — especially our kids — to take advantage of the natural resources our state offers in order to stay fit, healthy and happy.”

Although Colorado firmly retains its position as the leanest state, the percentage of Colorado residents who are obese nevertheless is increasing, rising from 16.9 percent to 17.6 percent.

California was the only state to hold steady in its obesity rate at 22.7 percent, the same as last year. Because of this, California’s position in the Fattest States rankings dropped from 30 to 36. Pennsylvania dropped four places, and Texas dropped three places.

In general, states in the West and New England rank lowest in the fattest states rankings, while states in the South and the Rust Belt tend to rank highest.

CalorieLab computed the fattest state rankings for this year and last based on the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System database maintained by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. The rankings use a three-year average in order to smooth out statistical fluctuations.

Because of the overall increase in obesity, CalorieLab this year shifted the color coding used in its map one percentage point higher to maintain an approximately equal number of states per color. This means that this year’s map cannot be directly compared to last year’s and earlier years. CalorieLab’s United States of Obesity 2007 map can be downloaded in various formats (small GIF, large GIF, SVG, EPS). [Digg this]



The CalorieLab United States of Obesity Fattest States Ranking 2006 2006
Rank 2007
Rank State % Obese
2006 % Obese or
Overweight
2006 3-year
Obesity
Average % Obesity
Change Ranking
Change
1 1 Mississippi 31.4 66.7 30.6 1.1 0
3 2 West Virginia 31.0 67.0 29.7 1.1 1
2 3 Alabama 30.5 65.0 29.4 0.7 -1
4 4 Louisiana 27.1 63.0 28.3 0.8 0
9 5 South Carolina 29.4 65.4 27.9 1.6 4
6 6 Tennessee 28.8 65.3 27.8 1.3 0
5 7 Kentucky 28.0 66.4 27.5 0.8 -2
7 8 Arkansas 26.9 63.8 27.0 0.6 -1
8 9 Indiana 27.8 62.8 26.8 0.6 -1
13 Oklahoma 28.8 64.8 26.8 1.5 3
11 Michigan 28.8 64.8 26.8 1.2 0
14 12 Missouri 27.2 62.9 26.3 1.2 2
10 Texas 26.1 62.4 26.3 0.5 -3
12 14 Georgia 27.1 61.7 26.1 0.6 -2
16 15 Ohio 28.4 63.9 26.0 1.2 1
15 16 Alaska 26.2 64.2 25.8 0.9 -1
17 17 North Carolina 26.6 62.8 25.6 0.9 0
20 18 Nebraska 26.9 63.9 25.4 1.0 2
18 19 North Dakota 25.4 64.5 25.1 0.6 -1
22 20 South Dakota 25.4 64.1 24.9 0.8 2
21 Iowa 25.7 62.9 24.9 0.6 0
29 22 Wisconsin 26.6 63.4 24.7 1.9 7
19 23 Pennsylvania 24.0 61.3 24.5 0.1 -4
25 24 Virginia 25.1 61.8 24.4 1.1 1
23 Illinois 25.1 61.7 24.4 0.5 -2
24 Maryland 24.9 60.7 24.4 1.0 -2
26 27 Kansas 25.9 62.3 24.3 1.1 -1
27 28 Minnesota 24.7 62.7 23.7 0.6 -1
28 29 Delaware 26.0 63.8 23.5 0.7 -1
33 30 Oregon 24.8 60.7 23.3 1.1 3
31 31 Washington 24.2 60.7 23.2 0.8 0
32 32 Idaho 24.1 59.7 23.1 0.8 0
34 Maine 23.1 59.7 23.1 1.1 1
35 34 Florida 23.1 59.6 22.9 1.1 1
37 35 Wyoming 23.3 61.4 22.8 1.1 2
30 36 California 23.3 58.8 22.7 0.0 -6
41 37 Nevada 25.0 63.6 22.4 1.3 4
36 New York 22.9 58.3 22.4 0.7 -2
38 New Hampshire 22.4 60.7 22.4 0.7 -1
39 40 District of Columbia 22.5 54.6 22.2 0.7 -1
40 New Jersey 22.6 59.9 22.2 0.8 -1
42 42 New Mexico 22.9 59.8 22.0 0.9 0
43 43 Arizona 22.9 59.6 21.7 0.9 0
44 44 Utah 21.9 54.9 21.2 0.4 0
45 45 Montana 21.2 59.3 20.7 0.8 0
48 46 Rhode Island 21.4 61.0 20.5 1.0 2
46 47 Connecticut 20.6 58.8 20.1 0.5 -1
47 48 Vermont 21.2 56.0 20.0 0.5 -1
49 49 Massachusetts 20.3 55.5 19.8 1.2 0
50 50 Colorado 18.2 54.9 17.6 0.7 0
NA N.A. Hawaii 20.6 56.1 N.A. N.A. N.A.


Rankings were computed by CalorieLab based on a three-year average of state-by-state statistics for adult obesity percentages from the CDC’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System database. Obesity is defined as a BMI of 30.0 or over, overweight as a BMI of 25.0 to 29.9. 2004 BMI data was not collected in Hawaii, so a three-year obesity average could not be computed for the rankings, but a two-year average using 2005 and 2006 data would be 20.2%.

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